Le Cimetière des Chiens, Asnières sur Seine, Paris, France


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Oh My Dog! 

2017/ ongoing


by Diambra Mariani and Francesco Mion


When our 12 years old dog died it was a terribly painful experience. In addition to this, I must admit we weren’t totally prepared to handle the disposal of his body.
Our vet was luckily really helpful and we finally opted for a single cremation: in a few days they gave us back a wooden box with his ashes, with a golden plate with his name on it.
We found it really weird, but what other options did I have?
This was the beginning of our still ongoing research in this field: what people do when they loose their pet?

San Antonio Abbad Memorial Center, a pet funeral service in Madrid (Spain)

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A dog at San Antonio Abbad Memorial Center, a pet funeral service in Madrid (Spain)

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Zaira and Daniel, waiting for the urn with the ashes of their rabbit Billie

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Waiting area at San Antonio Abbad Memorial Center

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Daniel has a tattoo with the name of one his pets.

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Pet urn

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The owner of San Antonio Abbad Memorial Center (Madrid, Spain)

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The guest book at San Antonio Abbad Memorial Center

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From the guest book

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A pocket urn for pet ashes.

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According to FEDIAF (European Pet Food Industry) Facts & Figure 2014, the estimated number of European households owning at least one pet animal is 75 millions: such an impressive number!


In the report “Because they’re Worth It: Pet Care Global Overview” published by Euromonitor on October 2016 they say that “Pet humanisation continues to deepen, as the companionship provided by pets, particularly cats and dogs, appears to address a fundamental psychological need in many people as society becomes more urbanised and atomized”.
People and Industry approach to pet loss endorse such a position.

A pocket urn for pet ashes

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The fridge where they keep pets' bodies before the cremation.

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Urn for pet ashes

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A cat before an individual cremation. 


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Interior of the jewelry lab in Barcelona where they create jewels using pet ashes diamonds

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The jewelry lab in Barcelona where they create jewels using pet ashes diamonds 

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The jewelry lab in Barcelona where they create jewels using pet ashes diamonds

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Pet ashes urns

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In a society in which death is often removed we were sure to make interesting discoveries.
So far we found pet cemeteries, pet funeral services, a small firm that sell diamonds made by pet ashes, a tattoo artist specialized in footprints, a psychologist who offers her help to people who are grieving the loss of an animal companion, a taxidermist who embalmed cats and dogs...

The footprint of Billy the rabbit

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Yasmine De la Vega, founder and owner of Amity Diamonds, a small firm that sell diamonds made by pet ashes.

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The jewelry lab in Barcelona where they create jewels using pet ashes diamonds

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Cementerio de Pequeños Animales, Barcelona, Spain

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Yasmine De la Vega, founder and owner of Amity Diamonds, a small firm that sell diamonds made by pet ashes, shows a jewels of her line.

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Laura Tedesco with her dog Didi. When she lost her dog Princess she decided to contact Amity Diamonds, a small firm that sell diamonds made by pet ashes. She's now in the middle of the process.


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Amity Diamond jewelry

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REIWAG Facility Services, a pet funeral service in Vienna, Austria. In the picture: the waiting room where the owners of pets can stay during the cremation.

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Melanie Wachter works in a pet funeral service in Vienna, Austria, called REIWAG Facility Services.

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REIWAG Facility Services, a pet funeral service in Vienna, Austria.

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Pet Cemetery in Vienna, Austria

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Pet Cemetery in Vienna, Austria

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Pet Cemetery, Barcelona, Spain

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